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Vintage Hurricane Lamps

Vintage Hurricane Lamps

Vintage Glass Hurricane Lamps

Hurricane lamps date back a few centuries, well before the modern day lighting we are familiar with now. Many individuals of later generations may not know what a hurricane lamp is. To recognize vintage hurricane lamps, look for a glass base that fills with oil and sits on a brass or sometimes metal base. The globe of a vintage hurricane lamp, also known as a chimney, is longer than its base and has an opening on the top. It sits atop a metal or brass bracket of sorts, with a wick that moves up and down and sits in the oil at the bottom. The chimney of a hurricane lamp has two different functions. Firstly it helps to emit light throughout the room with the help from the globe. Secondly the globe protects the wick and flame from wind or drafts, thus the name hurricane lamp.

Hurricane lamps date as far back as 1780 when the son of a Swiss watchmaker came up with an idea. He created something unique that helped light up dark rooms in households and places of business. Back in the early days of the hurricane lamps, the oil used was often either whale oil or olive oil to help ignite the adjustable wick. Although they were convenient when created, they did have a few drawbacks. The illumination was not very bright, the oils often smoked a lot, and a breeze could put out the flame. Despite the setbacks of such a creation, they were used in many different ways and for different reasons.

Vintage Hurricane Lamps

Vintage Hurricane Lamps On Ships

As mentioned before, aside from their setbacks vintage hurricane lamps had many different uses for different reasons. The 18th and 19th centuries were chock full of ships due to the fact that roadways of today were still an unknown mode of transportation. Whether the ships were pirate ships, naval vessels, vintage hurricane lamps could be seen hanging from the ships. Furthermore the vintage lamps we also recorded being on sea battle vessels or even transatlantic voyages. They were also placed in cabins to light dark spaces and were even used as signals from ship to ship.

Movie Set Lamps

Before the fluorescent movie lights of today lit up movie studios, hurricane lamps came in handy when filming various pictures. Especially during the Civil War era, Americans often associated hurricane lamps in their favorite films with the Civil War era. They were a popular staple for many in the 1800s and 1900s and could be seen in various films as lighting for small abodes and extravagant homes. Vintage hurricane lamps were used in many Western films as well and individuals today still associate them with such features.

Modern Times

Believe it or not, there are still some areas of the country that have no modern electricity and depend on hurricane lighting or candlelight for their homesteads. While hurricane lamps are not an item that is still used every day in many societies there is no denying that their presence is a wonderful addition for emergency lighting needs and most households should have at least one or two stored away for such situations.

There is no denying the fact that hurricane lamps give off a romantic glow and warmth to any household that takes pleasure in using them in modern times. The world is so used to the benefits of technology, it’s nice to consider that vintage hurricane lamps can make any house feel homey, cozy, and they offer a piece of history that many do not think about. While they may not be the first choice for modern time lamps, these lamps are pieces of our history that many people choose not to forget about and indulge in when possible. They also make great gifts for those we care about. Vintage hurricane lamps are a great choice for the older generation, history lovers, scholars, students, homesteaders, preppers, and those we love that reside in rural areas.

Vintage Hurricane Lamps

Vintage Hurricane Lamps

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Vintage Hanging Lamps

Vintage Hanging Lamps

Vintage Hanging Lamps For Sale

When you think about vintage hanging lamps, dozens of different pictures may pop into your mind. Vintage hanging lamps may include pendant lamps, chandeliers, candelabras, sconces, and much more. They have been made with simple designs right up to designs that included stained-glass. The styles are endless, but they are still incredible additions to any home or office or any interior space you can think of. Hanging lamps have a history that dates back centuries.

A Look At The Vintage Hanging Lamps History

The history of vintage hanging lamps is a long one, but we’ll try to summarize it for you. The first hanging lamps were created, literally, thousands of years ago. They were simply made of clay and various animal fat was used as their fuel source. A bit later, oil was used to fire either bronze or glass. Sometime in the Middle Ages, they hung in churches or other buildings attached to a pulley of sorts so they could be relit or put out. Many of the metal fixtures held a bowl or container of some type of oil for lighting. While some used oil for lighting, others were created for candles to be lit in.

Around the 1800s, gas-fueled lamps were created and used by people that could afford them. They were basically sconces that hung on the walls of homes or other interior locations. The mid-1800s brought about kerosene lamps. While we still associate them with being tabletop lamps, kerosene was used to fuel Victorian era hanging lamps as well. Then came the 20th century and the creation of electricity, and the rest is history.

How These Lamps Are Made

The materials used for vintage hanging lamps varied from clay back thousands of years ago to metal, brass, steel, porcelain and the list goes on. Today hanging lamps are made of metal or brass with etched glass, stained glass, and intricate carvings. These can range from simple right up to chandeliers that are worth thousands even millions of dollars. There are no longer constraints from using certain materials due to fire that was used to light the lamps originally, so manufacturers can make hanging lamps any way they choose.

Vintage hanging lamps may be a thing of the past, but the new modernized versions are nice to have also. It all depends on your taste and what you are looking for. Modern hanging lamps are easy to come by, they can be found on the shelves of any hardware store or department store all over the world. But if you’re looking for something more, vintage hanging lamps can be found in second-hand stores, thrift stores, even antique and collectible stores. With their long history, they can give the customer a sense of nostalgia, a piece of our history, and they are certain to be the topic of discussion among many.

Vintage Hanging Lamps

Vintage Hanging Lamps

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Vintage Lampshades

Vintage LampShade

Install A Vintage Lampshades On Your Lamp

Vintage lampshades come in all colors, shapes, sizes, and were more popular in one era than another. But the one aspect they all have in common is that they are at least 50 years old when following collector standards. If an item is 50 years old to 99 years old it is still considered Vintage in most circles. When its age puts it over 100 years old, it then becomes antique.

When searching for the perfect vintage lampshades for your antique desk lamp, be sure to check thrift stores, antique stores, online stores and online auctions as they are a popular seller for many sites such as Amazon or eBay. Many times you can find treasures at garage sales and craft markets. Furthermore the person selling probably has no idea that it could turn out to be a valuable item. As the old adage says, “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure.”

Electricity Helped Bring Lamps To More Households

In the 19th century, as home electricity became a much more popular household item, manufacturers began creating lamp shades of all sizes and colors for clients. The creation of lampshades predates the 19th century, however it was after the creation of electricity. Their numbers grew exponentially as manufacturers jumped on the bandwagon to make unique lampshades for the newly found amenity.

With electricity in almost every home, lampshade manufacturers began to think of the different ways to light up living spaces. They began to craft lampshades for customers with a variety of lighting from romance and reading to just sitting relaxing. Nothing was unheard of, whether lampshades  supplied a lot of light or just a little. Some lampshades would commonly supply less lighting, so the race was on to see who could make the most and the best for their customers using a soft discrete glow.

Some of the first lampshades made were for kerosene lanterns. These were designed to keep out drafts from the flame as the homes were not sealed very well. The shade ensured the flame didn’t extinguish and to allow for more light to glow throughout homes. Kerosene lampshades were made of glass and glass of all colors, shapes, sizes. Many were simple glass globes, but some were created with simple designs or sketches on them.

After the kerosene lampshades were produced, and electricity began, manufacturers began to look at Art Noveau designs. Being inspired from plants, flowers, animals, hand cut glass patterns and blown glass patterns began to emerge. As the time went on, vintage lampshades became more intricate and some are extremely rare finds nowadays and would cost quite a bit of money.

Vintage LampShades

Mainstream Antique Lampshades

While the decades passed and more manufacturers continued to move forward with new designs and modern designs. Stained-glass and more elaborate colored finishes become mass produced.  However some companies stayed true to their vintage roots and went backward to recreate the antique patterns of history. Whether you find yourself with a Tiffany lamp from decades ago or a more modernized version, vintage lampshades are true treasures to have and if given the chance to own one without breaking your pocketbook, they are worth every penny you spend on them. Do some research of your own and see what stands out to your taste and room decor.  No matter what you end up with you can be certain any vintage lampshade that you have in your home will be a great conversation starter with guests

Vintage Lampshades

Vintage Lampshades